Copyright Rights

Copyright Rights

The owner of a Copyright really owns a “bundle” of rights, like a bundle of sticks. Each stick or right can be sold or assigned separately to a third party. The rights owned by the author are as follows:

  1. The Right to Reproduce the Work: the right to copy, imitate, reproduce, duplicate, or transcribe the Work in fixed form, i.e., to reproduce the Work in copies or phonorecords.
  2. The Right to Derivative Works: the right to prepare Works based upon the original Work, i.e., to modify the Work.A new Work that is based upon an existing Work is a “derivative Work.”
  3. The Right to Distribution: the right to distribute copies or phonorecords of the Work to the public by sale or other transfer of ownership or by renting, leasing, or lending.
  4. The Right to Perform the Work Publicly: in the case of literary, musical, dramatic, and choreographic Works, pantomimes, and motion pictures and other audiovisual Works, the right to recite, play, dance, act, or show the Work at a public place or to transmit it to the public.
  5. The Right to Publicly Display the Work: the right to show a copy of the Work directly to the public (e.g., hanging up a copy of a painting in a public place) or by means of a website, film, slide, or television image at a public place or to transmit it to the public.
  6. The Right to Perform the Work Publicly: (in the case of sound recordings) by means of a digital audio transmission.

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